The Science of Love and Sexual Attraction

The Science of Love and Sexual Attraction

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Observations relevant to this website

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 Sat 30th August 2013

There is a female who works in my local supermarket who is a good example of someone who has not got a lot of Factor B. She is about 38 and although quite attractive she does not respond to mild flirting like the other female staff that I encounter (I am male) in the supermarket.  I am convinced that she has a very small amount of Factor B.  I have managed to get some response to my flirting with her but it is very hard work whereas by contrast I get a response off the other females in the supermarket without any great effort.  I do not think she is homosexual.  I would have to get to know her better to establish that. She gives barely any response to eye contact whereas the other females in the supermarket give a predictable response with eye contact.  Also conversation is hard work with this 38 year old and she tends to be a bit snappy compared to the other helpful ladies in the supermarket.

30th July 2013

Last week on British television I saw a documentary about a silent film actress called Clara Bow from American films of the 1920's. She was called the “It” girl. This actress had a lot of sexual charisma. The name came about because a romantic novel called “It” was written in 1927 by an English author called Elinor Glyn. Much speculation and writings at this time occurred as to what “It” was.

Elinor Glyn was interviewed sometime in the early thirties as to what “It” was. You can see this interview on this Youtube link;    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xs4HjiLSeJw&list=LLpGthobpX9Gkanmk2rzsKtQ .

The interviewer asked Elinor if “It” wasn't just sex appeal to which she replied defensively “then every good looking girl in the world would have “It” if that were true”, whereas according to her way of thinking one in 10,000 females had “It” The interviewer then asked her “how do you tell who has got “It”. Is it the way someone talks or moves” to which she replied “to give it its most exact description, it emanates from the eyes”.

What she is talking about here (some 80 years ago) is what I am talking about in this website. Someone who has "It" has a much higher amount of Factor B units say as an approximation 2000 units compared to the average of 1000 (arbitrary figures) and probably a higher than average amount of Factor A units. They also have a much higher than average amount of Factor B and Factor A “purity”. What I mean by this is the explanation I have given using the analogy of the two beakers X and Y in the Observation page on this website. The two beakers contain liquid representing the quantity of Factor A and Factor B the person has and their “purity” based on the bad experiences they have accumulated in life with respect to experiences in the main to with members of the same sex and the opposite sex. Also the final major attribute that they have is a much higher than average intelligence. The combination of these four elements with higher than average quantities will enable a person to have “It”.  To have this combination of the above attributes is a rarity say, you guessed it, one in 10,000 like she says in the video.  The combination of these elements gives a person that aura of “power”. This is why she refers in the video to the Tiger in the Zoo having “It”. He is king of the jungle.

Some males have “It” as well (probably 1 in 10,000). Two of the famous american film actors of the past who have had “It” were John Wayne and Robert Mitcham. They emanated power and calmness on screen. A current male actor with “It” is Englishman Daniel Craig who plays James Bond (at the time of writing).

For the other 9.999 people who do not have “It” there is every gradation in between depending on what degree of the 4 elements a person has. It’s rather like by comparison a gradation from the top tennis players in the world all the way down through all the different levels of abilities in tennis to the tennis players with, by comparison, a poor standard of tennis.

 ©  Copyright England, 15th December 2018   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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